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Structured Homework Strategy Helps ADHD Kids

ADHD and classroom challenges

❶Usually have problems with long-term projects where there is no direct supervision. Contents of the IEP — Guide to the Individualized Education Program IEP , a document developed by the child's parents and school staff that addresses the special educational services that the child will receive.

Helping Students with Attention Deficit Disorder Succeed at School

Homework Help for ADHD
ADHD and Homework: The Approach
Helping Children and Teens with ADHD Succeed at School

Typically, children with ADHD have problems with self-control -- simply not wanting to do the homework -- or with forgetfulness -- forgetting to write down assignments and to take home everything they need to complete it, Kapalka tells WebMD.

Kapalka evaluated 39 children, ages 6 to 10, and enrolled the help of their 39 teachers. Teachers taught a mainstream or inclusion class that included at least one student with ADHD. All students in the study were boys, and all had "combined type" ADHD. If they weren't on medications at the start of the study, they didn't start them during the study. If they were on medications, they didn't change the dose during the study, so that the effect of the program could be evaluated more effectively.

The students were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a comparison group with no intervention. After two to three weeks, the groups were re-evaluated. But when he looked at a variety of homework issues and scored the treatment group's performance, he found a ''dramatic'' improvement, he says. The very tasks these students find the most difficult—sitting still, listening quietly, concentrating—are the ones they are required to do all day long. Neurological deficits, not unwillingness, keep kids with attention deficit disorder from learning in traditional ways.

As a parent, you can help your child cope with these deficits and meet the challenges school creates. You can provide the most effective support: There are a number of ways you can work with teachers to keep your child on track at school. Together you can help your child with ADHD learn to find his or her feet in the classroom and work effectively through the challenges of the school day. For your child to succeed in the classroom, it is vital that you communicate his or her needs to the adults at school.

It is equally important for you to listen to what the teachers and other school officials have to say. Try to keep in mind that your mutual purpose is finding out how to best help your child succeed in school. Whether you talk over the phone, email, or meet in person, make an effort to be calm, specific, and above all positive—a good attitude can go a long way in communication with school. Helping Them Succeed at School.

You can arrange to speak with school officials or teachers before the school year even begins. If the year has started, plan to speak with a teacher or counselor on at least a monthly basis.

Together, write down specific and realistic goals and talk about how they can be reached. Listen to what they have to say—even if it is sometimes hard to hear. Ask the hard questions and give a complete picture. Be sure to list any medications your child takes and explain any other treatments.

Ask if your child is having any problems in school, including on the playground. Find out if your child can get any special services to help with learning.

As a parent, you can help by developing a behavior plan for your child—and sticking to it. Kids with attention deficit disorder respond best to specific goals and daily positive reinforcement—as well as worthwhile rewards. Yes, you may have to hang a carrot on a stick to get your child to behave better in class.

Create a plan that incorporates small rewards for small victories and larger rewards for bigger accomplishments. Click here to download a highly regarded behavior plan called The Daily Report Card, which can be adjusted for elementary, middle, and even high school students with ADHD. Children with ADHD exhibit a range of symptoms: As a parent, you can help your child with ADHD reduce any or all of these types of behaviors.

Students with ADHD may be so easily distracted by noises, passersby, or their own thoughts that they often miss vital classroom information. These children have trouble staying focused on tasks that require sustained mental effort. They may seem to be listening to you, but something gets in the way of their ability to retain the information. Helping kids who distract easily involves physical placement, increased movement, and breaking long work into shorter chunks. Kids with attention deficit disorder may struggle with controlling their impulses, so they often speak out of turn.

In the classroom or home, they call out or comment while others are speaking. Their outbursts may come across as aggressive or even rude, creating social problems as well. You can use discreet gestures or words you have previously agreed upon to let the child know they are interrupting.

Praise the child for interruption-free conversations. Children with ADHD may act before thinking, creating difficult social situations in addition to problems in the classroom. Kids who have trouble with impulse control may come off as aggressive or unruly. Finally, look for ways to motivate a student with ADHD by offering rewards on a point or token system.

To head off behavior that takes time from other students, work out a couple of warning signals with the student who has ADHD. As a teacher, you can make changes in the classroom to help minimize the distractions and disruptions of ADHD.

Teaching techniques that help students with ADHD focus and maintain their concentration on your lesson and their work can be beneficial to the entire class. British Columbia Ministry of Education. Includes articles on lesson planning, instructional techniques, behavioral strategies, and communication with parents. Addresses school issues and special education for students with ADHD. Center for Parent Information and Resources.

Contents of the IEP — Guide to the Individualized Education Program IEP , a document developed by the child's parents and school staff that addresses the special educational services that the child will receive.

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For a child with ADHD just getting the assignment written down can be a monumental task. Here's how to help with their homework.

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Homework assignments can overwhelm and frustrate students with ADHD who struggle with executive functions, focus, and organization. Here, find .

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Homework can be a source of frustration and difficulty particularly for students with ADHD. As a parent, you can help lessen that frustration by creating an organized and comfortable space within your home for your child to do homework. Aug 16,  · Structured Homework Strategy Helps ADHD Kids. ADHD and Homework Help: Second Opinion. Calif., who cares for students with ADHD. He reviewed the study for WebMD but was not involved in it.

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ADHD and School Helping Children and Teens with ADHD Succeed at School. Homework Help for Students with ADHD – Practical and detailed descriptions of homework strategies for children with ADHD. (Verywell). Homework Help for Kids With ADHD. Tackling the ADHD Homework Challenge. Other parents use sticker charts to help children work toward a .