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To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee - Essay

Types of essay on To Kill a Mockingbird

❶First of all, pick a topic that seems to be more suitable for you.

Introduction

How To Kill a Mockingbird summary should look like?
Moral principles as a part of To Kill a Mockingbird character analysis
Analytical Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird

It is also helpful when you start working on To Kill a Mockingbird character analysis. Arthur "Boo" Radley and Tom Robinson are the most tragic characters of the book who are in some way similar to each other. One of them is a person rejected by society because of the skin color with which he was born.

Tom is accused unfairly and sentenced to death. Arthur, another one, hides behind the walls of an old house trying to escape social cruelty. Both of these characters are compared to a Mockingbird, as they are mostly innocent. In an essay on To Kill a Mockingbird, it is essential to note that Harper Lee describes such things as racism, hypocrisy, and other ugly traits of the society through the eyes of a child who sees them in an entirely different light. This book is a bildungsroman, or in other words, an educational novel.

Its goal is to show us that a child learns how to be a human being by observing all the hardships of surrounding reality.

Essay topics examples for an essay on To Kill a Mockingbird The amount of To Kill a Mockingbird essay prompts online proves facts that this book hasn't lost its relevance even today. Such kind of books can be an exciting read at any age.

It is about children, but not only written for them. When you come across this topic, think about why such relationships are possible, how the children perceive Radley, and what is his reason for having warm feelings towards them.

The book is notable for giving a clear image of an American family. Does it seem real or maybe there are some differences between the presentation in a book and real life? Has an American family changed since then? Discussing the book title is one of the most popular topics when it comes to writing To Kill a Mockingbird book summary or any other essay type about the novel. It is hard to count opinions expressed on this topic over time.

Nevertheless, think of those that seem more suitable to you. There are several characters and situations which you can relate to this topic. Take your time and choose the most suitable one. Maycomb citizens' attitude to Atticus Finch: The plot involves Tom who is accused of raping a white girl. The community is torn apart and Atticus decides to defend him.

Despite the evidence that clears him, Tom is found guilty. The primary theme is that of racial injustice and the loss of innocence, with the lesser themes of class courage compassion and gender in the American deep south. In particular, there are three themes:.

Innocence and Experience There are three main children in the story who react to the harsh reality of the trial. All lose their innocence. Dill panics and is filled with fear, Jem grows cynical and disillusioned with the so-called Justice system.

Scout reacts more positively, hoping for social change. The main lesson the children learn is that in small towns people who do not conform become marginalized. They also see what adults do not about the loneliness and rejection people like Boo, Dolpus and Tom experience. Scout learns that children are already seen as acceptable or not based on circumstances they cannot control from Aunt Alexandra condemnations and judgments about the Radleys, Cunninghams and others.

The Enmity and Tension The town is seething with mistrust, amnesty and hate. Prejudice further divides the town by race and class and a price is paid. Racial prejudice is the main focus but class differences and heredity and inherited social status unfairly dictates how people are treated. In this community, economic hardship plays a great part. The night before the trial of Tom Robinson is to begin, a group of local men threaten a lynching, but Scout inadvertently disrupts their plan when she recognizes the father of a schoolmate in the crowd of would-be lynchers.

When the trial begins, Atticus tries to protect his children from the anger and prejudice they would hear; however, Scout, Jem, and Dill sneak into the courtroom and sit in the balcony with the black community. Mayella and her father testify that Tom raped Mayella after he was asked onto their property to break up an old chifforobe into firewood.

Atticus, however, proves Tom's innocence by demonstrating that while Mayella's face was beaten and bruised on her right side, Tom's left arm had been rendered completely useless by an earlier injury. Therefore, Atticus concludes, Tom could not possibly be the left-handed assailant who struck Mayella on the right side of her face.

Atticus further suggests that it was Bob, Mayella's father, who beat her, and that, in fact, no rape occurred. Before the jury departs to deliberate, Atticus appeals to their sense of justice, imploring them not to allow racial prejudice to interfere with their deliberations. However, after two hours, the jury returns with a guilty verdict, sentencing Tom to be executed for rape.

Later, Tom is shot to death during an attempt to escape from jail. The following fall, Bob Ewell, incensed by Atticus's treatment of him during the trial, attacks Scout and Jem with a knife as they are walking home from a school Halloween pageant. Boo Radley, secretly observing the scene, intervenes in the scuffle, and Bob Ewell is stabbed and killed in the process.

Called to the scene, the Sheriff and Atticus agree to not report Boo's involvement to the police, because a trial against him would likely be prejudiced. Intimately aware of issues of prejudice due to the Tom Robinson case, Atticus and the children agree to report that Ewell fell on his knife in the scuffle, sparing Boo the consequences of a legal trial. Scout realizes in retrospect that Boo has never been the threatening figure the children had imagined, and that he was responsible for leaving the mysterious gifts for them to find on his property.

After walking Boo home, Scout stands on the porch of his house looking out, finally seeing the world through a wider perspective. The central thematic concern of To Kill a Mockingbird addresses racial prejudice and social justice. Atticus Finch represents a strongly principled, liberal perspective that runs contrary to the ignorance and prejudice of the white, Southern, small-town community in which he lives.

Atticus is convinced that he must instill values of equality in his children, counteracting the racist influence. Lee makes use of several images and allegories throughout the novel to symbolize racial conflict. The children's attitudes about Boo, for example, represent in small scale the foundation of racial prejudice in fear and superstition. The rabid dog that threatens the town has been interpreted as symbolizing the menace of racism.

Atticus's shooting of the rabid dog has been considered by many critics as a representation of his skills as an attorney in targeting the racial prejudices of the town. The central symbol of the novel, the mockingbird, further develops the theme of racial prejudice.

The unjust trial of Tom Robinson, in which the jury's racial prejudice condemns an innocent man, is symbolically characterized as the shooting of an innocent mockingbird. Toward the end of the novel, Scout realizes that submitting Boo to a trial would be akin to shooting a mockingbird—just as the prejudice against African Americans influences the trial of Tom Robinson, the town's prejudices against the white but mentally disabled Boo would likely impact a jury's view. The concept of justice is presented in To Kill a Mockingbird as an antidote to racial prejudice.

As a strongly principled, liberal lawyer who defends a wrongly accused black man, Atticus represents a role model for moral and legal justice. Atticus explains to Scout that while he believes the American justice system to be without prejudice, the individuals who sit on the jury often harbor bias, which can taint the workings of the system.

Throughout the majority of the novel, Atticus retains his faith in the system, but he ultimately loses in his legal defense of Tom. As a result of this experience, Atticus expresses a certain disillusionment when, at the conclusion of the book, he agrees to conceal Boo's culpability in the killing of Ewell, recognizing that Boo would be stereotyped by his peers. Atticus decides to act based on his own principles of justice in the end, rather than rely on a legal system that may be fallible.

To Kill a Mockingbird also can be read as a coming-of-age story featuring a young girl growing up in the South and experiencing moral awakenings. Narrated from Scout's point-of-view, the novel demonstrates the now-adult narrator's hindsight perspective on the growth of her identity and outlook on life.

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Humans are born with prejudice, as it is our way to remain on top of the social hierarchy, a modern day version of survival of the fittest. A great example of this is given in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, written in

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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: An Analysis - An Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird is a narrative written by Harper Lee. By definition T.K.A.M is a mediated presentation of a causally connected series of actions involving characters in conflict.

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Analytical Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird The story To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee won the Pulitzer Prize, and in a short time has become a classic and is used in schools in the USA. The plot and inspiration of the characters are drawn from her family, neighbors and an event that took place in Alabama in Analytical essay on To Kill a Mockingbird (Sample) Harper Lee’s story “To Kill A Mockingbird” presents a realistic story dating back to s that resonate today. The most important theme of the story is about courage.

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Your To Kill a Mockingbird essay prompts may also require that you point out character descriptions in the novel and trace the evolution of a particular character throughout all the events. The novel covers the events of almost four years, so naturally, every character does indeed change. Most critics agree that the strength of To Kill a Mockingbird lies in Harper Lee’s use of the point of view of Scout. This point of view works in two ways: It is the voice of a perceptive.