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Transitional Words and Phrases

Transitional Words

❶As a "part of speech" transition words are used to link words, phrases or sentences.

List of Transition Words

Transitional Words and Phrases
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Words that ADD information alsoandanotherbesidefirst, second, third, Words that show a TIME relationship after so much timeafter thatat firstbeforebeginning, endingeventuallyearliereven whenever sincefollowingfrom then onfrom, toin timelastlatermeanwhilenear, farnextnowoversoonstillthe next day, nightthenwhile.

Words that ADD information: Chris is on the basketball team this semester at Indiana School for the Deaf. In addition , he is on the soccer team. We will be here for one more week so we can finish up our work. Another reason we are staying longer is because we do not want to miss the Deaf Way conference. First of all , pour a half-cup of milk in the bowl; second , add two eggs; and third , stir the mixture. King Jordan because he is the first deaf president of Gallaudet. Besides that , I admire him because he is a great long distance runner.

Furthermore , he is a dedicated family man. All in all, there is not much to dislike about the man, except he is too perfect! Crystal likes camping in the mountains. Also , Crystal is an experienced hiker. These transition words serve as your writing glue to help your ideas flow freely and logically throughout your essay. It will be totally disastrous for a writer to assume that his readers would know what he knows and pursue his write ups with such a thought. The best approach is to write as if the readers need all the information you possess and that they need some stepping stones to cross the stream of ideas you are presenting to them.

Below is a list of paragraph transition words grouped under the relationship they indicate: To add information , you can use the following transition words or phrases — in addition, also, and, moreover, then, too, finally, as well, besides, furthermore, equally important.

To compare different ideas , you can use — similarly, likewise, in the same manner, in the same way. To concede a point , you can use — obviously, of course, agreed, certainly, granted, to be sure. To provide an example , you can use — for example, in other words, for instance, specifically, to illustrate.

To summarize ideas , you can use — in conclusion, in brief, to sum up, finally, hence, in short. To present contrasting ideas , you can use — on the other hand, however, in contrast, nonetheless, nevertheless, yet, at the same time, conversely.


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Not every paragraph transition requires a conjunctive adverb or transitional phrase; often, your logic will appear through a word or concept common to the last sentence of the preceding paragraph and the topic sentence of the following paragraph.

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Transitions within paragraphs: As with transitions between sections and paragraphs, transitions within paragraphs act as cues by helping readers to anticipate what is coming before they read it. Within paragraphs, transitions tend to be single words or short phrases.

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Transition words and phrases are vital devices for essays, papers or other literary compositions. They improve the connections and transitions between sentences and paragraphs. They improve the connections and transitions between sentences and paragraphs. Transitional words and phrases provide the glue that holds ideas together in writing. They provide coherence (that hanging together, making sense as a whole) by helping the reader to understand the relationship between ideas, and they act as signposts that help the reader follow the movement of .

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In writing, a transition is a word or phrase that connects one idea to another. This connection can occur within a paragraph or between paragraphs. Transitions are used to show how sen-tences or paragraphs are related to each other and how they relate to the overall theme of the. Transitional words and phrases connect sentences and paragraphs to each other. Paragraph transitions suggest a particular relationship between one idea and the next. Within a paragraph, transitions provide coherence: a sense that the paragraph contains one main argument or idea.