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Writing Effective Introductions

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❶The next part of your introduction explains to your reader how that hook connects to the rest of your essay.

Self Introduction Sample

Make it Part of Your Outline
For Longer Papers
The First Sentence

Don't let that blinking cursor thwart your efforts, though. There's no rule that says you have to write that all important first sentence first. In fact, leaving that until later can be helpful since you may be knee deep in page 7 of your epic term paper when the perfect first sentence comes to you. If you're in the middle of dissecting the role of Anime in the evolution of Western cartoons when inspiration strikes, just type out that baby right where you are — you can always copy, paste and tweak it when you're done.

There are several different ways you can hook your reader's interest when writing your introduction. Planting a hook at the beginning gives you a way to use a common narrative or return to your original ideas throughout the paper which can give the entire essay more flow as well as setting the stage for you to have a convenient way to bring it all together in the conclusion. Using a hook in the introduction simply refers to writing a sentence that captures the imagination and attention of the reader.

This is usually done with the first sentence as well as your final statement. Using a hook which also sets you up for a common thread throughout the essay is a great way to establish flow. For example, if you're writing about the proliferation of 'everyday celebrity' you can use Andy Warhol's famous quote about 15 minutes of fame for an initial hook and then introduce the rise and fall of any flash in the pan celebrity.

Throughout the essay you can use the time line of that celebrity's career as a way to advance the story and findings of your paper. This not only makes the paper flow better, it also gives the reader a personal interest to follow. The introduction for a college level paper has a lot of weight on its shoulders.

Draw your reader in gradually. For example, if you're writing an essay about drunk driving fatalities, you might start with an anecdote about a particular victim. Then you could provide national statistics, then narrow it down further to statistics for a particular gender or age group. After you've set up the context within which you're making your argument, tell your readers the point of your essay.

Use your thesis statement to directly communicate the unique point you will attempt to make through your essay. Avoid including fluff such as "In this essay, I will attempt to show Your outline should be specific, unique, and provable.

Through your essay, you'll make points that will show that your thesis statement is true — or at least persuade your readers that it's most likely true. Describe how you're going to prove your point. Round out your introduction by providing your readers with a basic roadmap of what you will say in your essay to support your thesis statement.

In most cases, this doesn't need to be more than a sentence. For example, if you're writing an essay about the unification of Italy, you might list 3 obstacles to unification. In the body of your essay, you would discuss details about how each of those obstacles was addressed or overcome. Instead of just listing all of your supporting points, sum them up by stating "how" or "why" your thesis is true. For example, instead of saying, "Phones should be banned from classrooms because they distract students, promote cheating, and make too much noise," you might say "Phones should be banned from classrooms because they act as an obstacle to learning.

Transition smoothly into the body of your essay. In many cases, you'll find that you can move straight from your introduction to the first paragraph of the body. Some introductions, however, may require a short transitional sentence at the end to flow naturally into the rest of your essay. If you find yourself pausing or stumbling between the paragraphs, work in a transition to make the move smoother. You can also have friends or family members read your easy.

If they feel it's choppy or jumps from the introduction into the essay, see what you can do to smooth it out. Read essays by other writers in your discipline. What constitutes a good introduction will vary widely depending on your subject matter. A suitable introduction in one academic discipline may not work as well in another.

Take note of conventions that are commonly used by writers in that discipline. Make a brief outline of the essay based on the information presented in the introduction. Then look at that outline as you read the essay to see how the essay follows it to prove the writer's thesis statement. Keep your introduction short and simple. Generally, your introduction should be between 5 and 10 percent of the overall length of your essay. If you're writing a page paper, your introduction should be approximately 1 page.

Always follow your instructor's guidelines for length. These rules can vary at times based on genre or form of writing. Write your introduction after you write your essay. Some writers prefer to write the body of the essay first, then go back and write the introduction. It's easier to present a summary of your essay when you've already written it. For example, you may realize that you're using a particular term that you need to define in your introduction.

Revise your introduction to fit your essay. If you wrote your introduction first, go back and make sure your introduction provides an accurate roadmap of your completed paper. Even if you wrote an outline, you may have deviated from your original plans. Given the shortness of the introduction, every sentence should be essential to your reader's understanding of your essay.

Structure your introduction effectively. An essay introduction is fairly formulaic, and will have the same basic elements regardless of your subject matter or academic discipline.

While it's short, it conveys a lot of information. The next couple of sentences create a bridge between your hook and the overall topic of the rest of your essay. End your introduction with your thesis statement and a list of the points you will make in your essay to support or prove your thesis statement.

I would first narrow your subject down to one sport so you can be more focused. Note that this will likely be an informative essay. After you do this, an interesting hook statement may be an anecdote describing an intense moment in that chosen sport to get your audience interested. This can be made up or from your own experience with the sport. Not Helpful 1 Helpful 6. An effective hook statement to start your essay about this topic may be a statistic about HIV, or perhaps an anecdote about someone facing this diagnosis and trying to make positive lifestyle changes for their health.

Not Helpful 1 Helpful 5. This is easier said than done of course, but a good intro starts with a quote, fact, or brief story that interests the reader.

If it interested you while reading or researching, it's a great thing to start with. Just keep it short and it will be great. Not Helpful 38 Helpful Skip it, write down your main points, and build the body of your essay. Once you know all the areas you want to cover, think about what links them all together, and what the main thing you're trying to convey is. Not Helpful 27 Helpful Start off with a mini thesis which states what the body paragraph is talking about.

Not Helpful 28 Helpful Start with the basics -- what do you think about the topic? What argument can you make about it? Once you have an argument, start jotting down the evidence for the argument. This evidence will make up your paragraphs later on.

Likely to fail under pressure, stress, or strain; lacking resistance: Perhaps that accounts for the words being so seared into my memory. Or perhaps it was just the first thing on the board that morning that made any sense to my numerically challenged mind. Here, the writer makes sweeping generalizations or vague assertions about the topic.

Such introductions often lack a thesis, suggesting that the writer does not have much to say. Can I cross out my opening paragraph with no loss of impact or meaning? If the answer is yes, then it's time to revise! For hours during breaks and inter-sessions, call Louis, Missouri United States of America Writing Effective Introductions Webster University. Worldwide Locations Map Search. Schedule a Tutoring Appointment.

Self Introduction for Scholarship

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Writing Introductions for Essays, Fall Rev. Summer 2 of 5 Statistics or Interesting Facts Provide attention-grabbing facts that will draw in your audience and show the importance of.

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Strategies for writing an effective introduction. Start by thinking about the question (or questions) you are trying to answer. Your entire essay will be a response to this question, and your introduction is the first step toward that end.

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A killer opening line and catchy introduction are exactly what you want for your essay. You want to write an essay introduction that says, “READ ME! To learn how to write an essay introduction in 3 easy steps, keep reading! Tips for Writing a Self-Introduction Essay A self-introduction essay might be one of the easiest essays to start. However, one needs to learn a few things to make the composition worth reading.

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Writing Effective Introductions Great writers know that effective and impacting essays begin with an interesting and engaging introduction that reveals their thesis . The introduction to an essay, admittance or any other paper may only be one paragraph, but it carries a lot of weight. An introduction is meant to draw the reader in, give them a preview of what the paper holds and convince them that reading it will be a rewarding experience – no pressure, right? The introduction may have plenty of responsibility but that doesn’t mean you need to sweat.