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Frederick Douglass

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❶Born into slavery, he escaped in and subsequently devoted his considerable rhetorical skills to the abolitionist movement.

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The two young girls are thrashed and are described as being cut in to pieces. The fact that not only the man of the house but also Mrs. Hamilton beats the young girls is appalling. Not only are they verbally abused but physically abused they are victims of the hatred to their race. These women are only weak because of their owners continuously bring them down; they have no strength to fight back. Her body strength is non-existent because not only is she a burn victim but also she can not work to build strength.

Douglass makes this point in previous chapters by showing the damaging self? African American women are victims in this narrative. Not only do they not have a voice or any spoken words but also they are only depicted when they are beaten and broken. The vulnerability of these women adds a sympathetic element that touches every reader whether female or male. Douglass shows how much slavery affected everyone from slaves, to housewives to the salve owners themselves. There was no person untouched from the devastating events that slavery caused.

Home Essays Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass 8 August We will write a custom essay sample on. In , he realized his long-cherished goal by escaping to New York. Once free, Douglass quickly became a prominent figure in the abolitionist movement. In , he delivered his first public address—an extemporaneous speech at an anti-slavery meeting in Nantucket, Massachusetts—and was invited by William Lloyd Garrison and other abolitionist leaders to work as a lecturer for the Massachusetts Antislavery Society.

By , Douglass's eloquent and cogent oratory had led many to doubt that he was indeed a former slave. He responded by composing a detailed account of his slave life, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, which was an immediate popular success.

Having opened himself to possible capture under the fugitive slave laws, Douglass fled that same year to Great Britain, where he was honored by the great reformers of the day.

Returning to the United States in , he received sufficient funds to purchase his freedom and establish The North Star, a weekly abolitionist newspaper. During the s and early s, Douglass continued his activities as a journalist, abolitionist speaker, and autobiographer.

By the outbreak of the Civil War, he had emerged as a nationally-recognized spokesman for black Americans and, in , advised President Abraham Lincoln on the use and treatment of black soldiers in the Union Army. His later years were chiefly devoted to political and diplomatic assignments, including a consulgeneralship to the Republic of Haiti, which he recounts in the revised edition of his final autobiographical work, the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, Written by Himself.

Douglass died at his home in Anacostia Heights, District of Columbia, in In his speeches on abolition, Douglass frequently drew on his first-hand experience of slavery to evoke pathos in his audience. He is most often noted, however, for his skillful use of scorn and irony in denouncing the slave system and its abettors.

One of the stock addresses in his abolitionist repertoire was a "slaveholders sermon" in which he sarcastically mimicked a pro-slavery minister's travesty of the biblical injunction to "do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

The several installments of Douglass's autobiography—which include the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave , My Bondage and My Freedom , and the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass —depart from the biting tone of his oratory and are often described as balanced and temperate, though still characterized by Douglass's dry, often ironic, wit.

While these works are valued by historians as a detailed, credible account of slave life, the Narrative is widely acclaimed as an artfully compressed yet extraordinarily expressive story of self-discovery and self-liberation. In it Douglass records his personal reactions to bondage and degradation with straightforward realism and a skillful economy of words. He based his novella The Heroic Slave on the real-life slave revolt aboard the American ship Creole in Douglass's only work of fiction, it celebrates the bravery of Madison Washington, who is portrayed as a lonely and isolated hero.

Appealing variously to the political, sociological, and aesthetic interests of successive generations of critics, Douglass has maintained his celebrated reputation as an orator and prose writer. Douglass's contemporaries viewed him primarily as a talented antislavery agitator whose manifest abilities as a speaker and writer refuted the idea of black inferiority. This view persisted until the s, when both Vernon Loggins and J.

Saunders Redding called attention to the "intrinsic merit" of Douglass's writing and acknowledged him to be the most important figure in nineteenth-century black American literature. In the s and s, Alain Locke and Benjamin Quarles respectively pointed to the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass and the Narrative as classic works which symbolize the black role of protest, struggle, and aspiration in American life.

Critics in recent years have become far more exacting in their analysis of the specific narrative and rhetorical strategies that Douglass employed in the Narrative to establish a distinctly black identity, studying the work's tone, structure, and placement in American literary history. In addition, scholars have since elevated the reputation of the Narrative, while noting that the later installments of his autobiography fail to recapture the artistic vitality of their predecessor.

Continued study and praise of the autobiographies and Douglass's other works may be taken as an indication of their abiding interest. Thomas Couser has observed, Douglass was a remarkable man who lived in an exceptionally tumultuous period in American history.

By recording the drama of his life and times in lucid prose, he provided works which will most likely continue to attract the notice of future generations of American literary critics and historians. The Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass. In the following review, originally published in , she praises Douglass's Narrative, commenting on the importance of the "just and temperate" observations that it contains.

Frederick Douglass has been for some time a prominent member of the Abolition party. He is said to be an excellent speaker—can speak from a thorough personal experience—and has upon the America has the mournful honor of adding a new department to the literature of civilization,—the autobiographies of escaped slaves.


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SOURCE: Review of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, in Critical Essays on Frederick Douglass, edited by William L. Andrews, G. K. Hall & Co., , pp. [Fuller.

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Frederick Douglas - Paper on Frederick Douglass In the 's, slavery was a predominant issue in the United States, one that most Americans in .

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- Frederick Douglass Essay Frederick Douglass was an African American slave reformer; he also was a writer and believed everyone should be free. Douglass once said “I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong.”. Douglass presents Sophia as much a victim of the institution of slavery as Douglass himself is. The fact that Sophia is a woman helps Douglass’s portrayal of her as a victim of slavery. It is significant that the male slaveholders of Douglass’s Narrative, even Hugh Auld, all appear to be already schooled in the vice of slavery.

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Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey (later known as Frederick Douglass) was born a slave in Talbot County, Maryland around the year He was an African American reformer, writer, and orator. He was an African American reformer, writer, and orator. Frederick Douglass Essay Examples. total results. What Does It Mean to Be American? words. 1 page. A Summary of the Life of Frederick Douglass. 1, words. Frederick Douglass's Views on the Possession of Power. words. 2 pages. The Perception of Slavery in the Minds of the Southerners. words.